Mike Davis & Justin Akers Chacon: No One is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence Print E-mail

on the U.S.-Mexico Border
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by Mike Davis and Justin Akers Chacon

With photographs by Julian Cardona

paperback, isbn 1931859353, 328 pages
Code: UHPNOI
Price: $14.00

“Is immigration really a ‘national crisis’? Justin Akers Chacón and Mike Davis attack the question by revealing the disturbing, centuries-old context for the cross-border working-class, and the resurgence of reactionary anti-immigrant politics and racist vigilante violence. No One Is Illegal powerfully argues that the borders themselves are barriers to imagining real social justice. An urgent, important must-read.”
--Jeff Chang, author Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation

“[The phrase] ‘no human being is illegal’ was coined by Bert Corona in the 1960s. Forty years later, Mike Davis and Justin Akers Chacón tell us the real story about the immigrant worker heroes.”
--Nativo V. Lopez, president, Mexican American Political Association

In No One Is Illegal Mike Davis and Justin Akers Chacón expose the racism of anti-immigration vigilantes and put a human face on the immigrants who daily risk their lives to cross the border to work in the United States. Countering the mounting chorus of anti-immigrant voices, No One Is Illegal debunks the leading ideas behind the often violent right-wing backlash against immigrants, revealing their deep roots in U.S. history, and documents the new civil rights movement that has mounted protests around the country to demand justice and dignity for immigrants.

No One Is Illegal features moving, evocative photos from award-winning photographer Julián Cardona.

Justin Akers Chacón is a professor of U.S. History and Chicano Studies in San Diego, California. He has contributed to the International Socialist Review and the book Immigration: Opposing Viewpoints.

Mike Davis is a historian, activist, and author of many books, including City of Quartz, The Monster at Our Door, and Planet of Slums. Davis teaches in the Department of History at the University of California at Irvine.

Julián Cardona was born in 1960 in Zacatecas, Mexico, and migrated to the border city of Juárez with his family as a small child. He worked as a technician in the maquiladora industry before becoming a photojournalist in 1993. In 2004, Cardona received a Cultural Freedom Fellowship from the Lannan Foundation.